The Wabash & Erie Canal

Looking to the side (right hand if you’re heading to Wabash) you can clearly see the canal bed here. It runs along the bike trail for quite some time, the how and why of that will be further down the trail. The Wabash-Erie Canal was a giant manmade ditch that was 4-9 feet deep in most places. Although trails and traces existed in the early 1800s, it was basically impossible to move large quantities of people and goods through them because of mud, the thickness of the forest that then covered Indiana, and predators that were commonplace in the wilderness (wolves and venomous snakes especially).  In 1836 or 1837 (sources argue a lot on this point), the first boat came through this hand dug waterway. Both Wabash and Lagro were Looking to the side (right hand if you’re heading to Wabash) you can clearly see the canal bed here. It runs along the bike trail for quite some time, the how and why of that will be further down the trail. The Wabash-Erie Canal was a giant manmade ditch that was 4-9 feet deep in most places. Although trails and traces existed in the early 1800s, it was basically impossible to move large quantities of people and goods through them because of mud, the thickness of the forest that then covered Indiana, and predators that were commonplace in the wilderness (wolves and venomous snakes especially).  In 1836 or 1837 (sources argue a lot on this point), the first boat came through this hand dug waterway. Both Wabash and Lagro were

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This is the only known image of the canal in Wabash. Looking at the south side of the Canal Street and Miami Street intersection, the canal is in the lower left corner. The image is actually edited by the photographer to make the canal appear larger in order to ensure the viewer recognizes the canal as the subject of the picture.

Map of the Wabash & Erie Canal